All posts in Style

Going Green Part 3: Dreaming Green


As I alluded to in Going Green Part 1 and my Dream Draft Wardrobe post I have a thing for olive corduroy jackets. I am not sure exactly what it is about them that calls to me, but they do. It could be the subtle yet distinctive color of olive or the softness of corduroy combined with the slouch of a soft-shouldered sack. Whatever the case may be it is an item that is high on my want list.
Olive Corduroy Sport CoatA few weeks back I spotted a fantastic example of an olive corduroy sport coat (see above). It was being auctioned on Ebay so I put this post on ice as I did not want to put extra eyes on it. The last thing I wanted to do was to have some poor trad’s heart broken when he was sniped at the last second, because of my post. Luckily for him it was not my size.

I saved this image primarily for myself. I will use it to remind me to stay focused on acquiring the pieces that I truly want instead of buying items that are close, but are on sale and available. I may also have to use it as a reference when I eventually break down and have something like this made, but mine will have patch pockets. For now I will just dream.

All in Together Now


Earlier this week while I was wearing the look pictured here I realized that what I was wearing was the result of several blog posts. I did not have this blog post in mind when I assembled the rig. I was merely excited to break the new-to-me green tie.
FruitionThe top half of the look contains references to two blog posts. As I mentioned above, the most notable is the green tie that I very recently featured in Going Green Part 1. This was its first outing and while some my find the combination too bold I enjoyed the tie immensely. The tie and shirt combination illustrates my fondness for wearing striped shirts with striped ties which I posted about as well (see here).
Green Tie & BlazerThe third and last post brought to life in this picture is about solid surcingles. I have learned over time that solid surcingles provide the best bang for the buck for me. While striped surcingles may be more fun I don’t wear them very often. On the other hand I will wear a solid surcingle everyday of the week (Solid Surcingle Post). In the that post I mentioned that my next purchase would be a natural colored surcingle. I purchased a natural one from Leatherman belts, but quickly learned that it was khaki that I was after. You can see my new khaki surcingle below.
Khaki SurcingleI like several things about this look. It is simple, but still interesting. It is formal enough for today’s dress codes, but still very casual. It embodies so many of the reasons why I am drawn to traditional American style.

Going Green Part 2: The Green Sweater

Shaggy Dog Sweater

In my last Going Green post I focused on ties, but this post moves away from green accessorizes and onto the wardrobe staple that is the Shetland sweater. I already have a forest green Shetland and get a lot of use out it it. This year I decided to invest in a new green sweater.
Green Shaggy Dog SweaterI mentioned not too long ago that I may have purchased a Shaggy Dog sweater from J.Press. In spite of the all time high prices of Shetlands, I did. I ordered a blue-green Shaggy Dog which I thought was going to be more green than blue, but that is not the case. While it is not the color that I was hoping for ( I was hoping for that light green that Ralph Lauren does so well.) it is a beautiful sweater with gorgeous color variation.

As for the sweater itself…It is a warm one. It is by far the warmest sweater that I own. The thickness is not immediately apparent until you take a look at the cuffs when turned back (,as I wear all of my sweaters). They look enormous. It is then that you realize just why it is so warm.

I found sizing to be a little tricky. I purchased a small and it was too large. More than anything it was too long in the sleeves and torso. I exchanged it for an XS and although I was worried it would be too small the fit turned out to be spot on. The XS fit like a true small.

I am happy to add this green sweater to the collection. I can already tell that it will get a lot of action on very cold days and will most likely be my number one choice for outdoor adventures this winter. The soft blue-green color will help to add a little color to the dark grey days of winter that lay ahead.

The Late 70s Prep Checklist

Wallabee Clarks

This post may cause many Ivy League Style enthusiasts to cringe as it contains talk of sneakers, puffy down vests, and other items (like the Clark Wallabees above) that either never existed during the heyday or were not part of the look. Quite a few of these items are have been incorporated into the Trad look which includes elements of Ivy League style as well as Prep.

FNB commentator (The Talk Ivy Forum), and my internet pal Stanshall (this man has a mind like a steel trap!) just recently put together an extensive list (,dare I say definitive?) of late 70s Prep items. I think that this list along with a few images from the Heavy Tweed Jacket archive does a great job of illustrating how Prep bridges together Ivy League Style and Trad. Feast on the wealth of knowledge dropped by Stanshall below.

The Definitive Late 70s Prep Checklist

L. L. Bean, Orvis, Eddie Bauer, Lands’ End, Gokeys, Talbot’s –

Down vests
Norwegian sweaters
L. L. Bean chamois shirts
Gray marled ragg sweaters
Sperry Top-Siders
Blucher mocs
Camp mocs
Levi’s straight cords
Khaki chinos, washed-out
Wide-wale cords, washed heavily, on the short side
Brooks Brothers ocbds
Brooks Brothers fun shirts in multicolored stripes
Bean mountain anoraks
60/40 parkas in various colors
Tretorn Nylites
Jack Purcells
Sperry canvas deck sneakers
Adidas Country, Stan Smith, Rod Laver
Boast or Lacoste longtail polo shirts, occasionally Fred Perry which was carried at the Co-Op
Nike white canvas tennis sneakers with toe bumper
Timberland boots

Late 70s PrepShetland crewneck sweaters including Shaggy Dogs and extra points for patchwork Shaggy Dog in various shades of blue
Bean brown canvas duffel bags
Ray-Ban aviators
Vuarnet skiing sunglasses (Lynx models)
Sweatshirts: crew; hoodie pullover; zip hoodies
Early fleece jackets, pre-Patagonia, e.g. Chuck Roast from New Hampshire
Brooks lambswool or cashmere v-neck sweaters
Custom printed t-shirts commemorating regatta, tournament, ski weekend, drinking championship, etc.
Bean ranger oxford
T-shirts and sweats from other schools you’ve played or visited or have a girlfriend at

Rugged Ivy WallabeeAn example of the late 70s Prep influence

Brooksflannel viyella shirts in tattersalls
Bean Woodsman’s pants of heavy gray wool with faint large red overcheck
Bean boots and Maine Hunting Shoes, lace-ups, pull-on loungers, and buckled models too
NY Yankees caps
Foot-Joy squash shoes in white mesh with gray suede and tan rubber soles, low-cut or extra-preppy high-top
Squash racquets
Volvos and Saabs
Clarks Wallabees
Rugby shirts from the socce*r locker or serious sporting goods shop not the mall
Icelandic sweater from Antartex Shop

Rugged IvyAnother example of the late 70s Prep influence

Bean corduroy weekend jacket (G9-style)
Bean sheepskin driver’s seat cover for the car
Bean “Peruvian”-type knit ski hat
Bean field watch, regular strap it came with
One blue blazer left over from high school, never to be worn, lives at bottom of pile of clothes in dorm closet and cannot be unrumpled
One tweed sport coat, either hand-me-down, thrift or from a proper shop
Couple of rumpled repp ties
Ragg socks only on coldest days
Good-quality old-school hiking boots
Straw hat from islands worn with tan first week after spring break
Walk shorts in September, April and May

As you can see not every Prep item on the list made into the Trad canon. This is similar to how Prep kept some of the Ivy League staples such 3/2 roll jackets, penny loafers, and chinos, but left out items like buckle back pants and added their own touches like Rod Lavers. There are definitely items on the list that I find cooler than others, but that is pretty standard. I am particular. Then there are items like wallabees and my trusty green down vest that I owe to the late 70s Preps. I am sure that many of you can find a few items of your own named on the list.

Going Green Part 1


When it comes to green in the Trad world we usually think Olive. This could be olive moleskin trousers, the classic cord sport coat in olive, or even outside of the olive spectrum there is iconic soft green OCBD sported by Miles. This post is not about any of the green items above, but about green ties.

Miles Knows about green.

My first green tie was the same as many of my readers and by far the most popular green tie, the Argyll & Sutherland repp. My next green tie was a more solemn repp that has served me well in both ultra conservative settings and on cool overcast days, but still has a nice pop of color (1st picture below). Next, I picked up this bright green repp that has become one of my very favorites (2nd picture below). These three ties got me hooked on green.
tumblr_ntnu6cfFy11ttpazyo1_1280Bright Green TieThis week Ask Andian Dr. D put up a whole lot of ties for sale and there were a fair number of green ones. The most exciting of these to me was the American version of the Malaya Regiment tie that I have been fawning over at Ben Silver for at least a year (1st tie below), but I could not stop there. As you can see by the ties that I selected (All featured below) there is a type of stripe that I love. I would describe this type of ties as bold yet conservative.
Malaya Regiment tieGreen RegimentalGreen Red Blue RegimentGreen Yellow Red Repp TieThe color green provides a great back drop for stripes (and foulards, but that’s  a whole other another post). Colors such as red, yellow, and purple stand out when set against it. If you don’t have a green tie in your collection I suggest that you add one. I suspect that it won’t be the last. I will share more on going green next week when I will reveal a few of my more predictable green purchases.

A quick side note. I paid under $20 for my Dr.D ties shown above. If you have never visited the Ask Andy Trad forum I will tell you that the Trad Exchange is a true gem. It alone is worth being a member.